Gilligan's Gold


by Ronald Rhodes, Keith Burkhill, F. David Thorpe
Ocean Software Ltd
1984
Crash Issue 11, December 1984   (1984-11-15)   page(s) 102

Platform-type games have certainly come a long way over the year. Gilligan's Gold is a good example of this development. Three screens, sitting side by side, make up the gold mine where Gilligan the intrepid hero is collecting the sacks and attempting to get them all into his wheelbarrow, which is up on the top level. The mine is a warren of passages and shafts with ladders in them and lifts. Sometimes the gold is behind a blocked wall and here the pickaxe comes in handy. It has a second use too - knocking outlaws over the head, for the mine is infested with them, and they are after Gilligan and the gold. They can also be knocked out by dropping gold sacks down shafts on top of them.

At the bottom of the mine a railcar runs up and down along the mine. It's possible to ride in this by hanging from the roof at a few marked points and then dropping onto the car at the right moment. This also works for the other railcars that run on the other levels. Gilligan is not allowed to fall more than a level or he loses a life, and being hit by a railcar isn't much better.

COMMENTS
Control Keys: Q/W left/right, P/ENTER up/down, SPACE for all actions
Joystick: Kempston, Sinclair 2, Protek, AGF
Keyboard Play: responsive, but up/down and action keys are awkwardly laid out
Use of colour: good
Graphics: large definite shapes and generally good
Sound: continuous tune
Skill Levels: 1
Lives: 3
Screens: 3
Special Features:


'Gilligan's Gold is another Commodore 64 to Spectrum conversion and unfortunately it hasn't come out as well as the other recent Ocean games. Needless to say though, it is still good, but the characters (you and your enemies) aren't as detailed as in the C64 version. The sound Is very good, playing a nice little tune. This is a fun game to play, but I don't think it's got tremendous lasting appeal like, say, Decathlon, one of my all time favourites.'

'The graphics are not ultra-brill, but this does not spoil the game which is really challenging. There are quite a few features which really add to the game. I almost died laughing watching the demo, It had lots of funny bits in it. I enjoyed the game itself even more. It's a bit like a Harold Lloyd Buster Keaton arcade game.'

'Whatever's the matter with the programmers today - are they being paid by Arthur Scargill, or is it just a coincidence that everyone's gone mining mad; maybe they're lust slow to catch onto the Manic Miner trend? Gilligan's Gold is another mining game, but more so than the others. The fact is that you have got to collect the gold in your wheelbarrow, and hack away at walls with your pick, whilst being chased by outlaws. Animation is this game is quite wonderful in some respects, such as when you knock one of the outlaws out - you can see stars around their heads and when they're coming round they start to pant, and you see their stomachs start to rise and fall. Even details such as a barrow's wheel whizzes round as you push it. I must say I do like the mining carts, which can be your enemy or saviour. There are only three screens to this game, but I think there's plenty to keep you going for quite a while, and besides, If you clear all the three screens of gold, maybe there Is a different type of layout - that's left for you to find out though! Taking everything into consideration, I think this will prove to be quite an addictive game as it is a very playable game. I like it.'

Use of Computer: 80%
Graphics: 77%
Playability: 80%
Getting Started: 79%
Addictive Qualities: 78%
Value For Money: 80%
Overall: 79%

Summary: General Rating: Very good, playable and addictive.

Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair User Issue 33, December 1984   page(s) 46

NO PICNIC FOR BEARS

THE MOST interesting thing about Gilligan's Gold from Ocean Software is the difference between the demonstration and what is actually possible. The game is set in a mine, and you control what looks like a pink teddy bear from marauding green bears as you collect gold.

The pink teddy in the demonstration had great fun digging out gold with a pick-axe and dashing up ladders and lifts to deposit his finds in a wheelbarrow. A favourite ruse is to drop a bag of gold down a mine shaft and onto an unsuspecting bear's head, causing him to collapse and see stars.

Sadly, our team found it near impossible to pick up the gold or pick-axe or to manoeuvre the wheelbarrow. We could not even make use of the pit bus, which would run down a bear as soon as look at one.

The speed and the attractive display show that it can be addictive.

Joanna Pegum

Memory: 48K
Price: £5.90


Gilbert Factor: 6/10

Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair Programs Issue 27, January 1985   page(s) 13

PRICE: £5.90
GAME TYPE: Arcade

There you were, innocently prospecting in the mine, collecting bags of gold and putting them in your barrow, when things began to be much more difficult. Green with envy, outlaws are trying to knock you out and steal your booty. It would be easy to avoid them except that the mine is maze-like in its intricacy, and there are pit trucks running out of control along many passages.

Gilligan's Gold has you racing against the clock to collect your gold and avoid the outlaws. There are some points in your favour. You can leap into the pit trucks at some points, and thus avoid the outlaws. You can also knock out the outlaws by dropping bags of gold on them as they climb ladders, or by taking a pickaxe and smashing them over the head with it.

There are a few minor irritations to the game. Picking something up is very difficult. You seize a pick, rush towards an outlaw with it, only to discover the pick is still lying on the ground and you are defenceless. Moving from screen to screen does seem to confuse the outlaws. One minute they are following you along a straight passage, the next they have vanished. Conversely, one can appear, hot on your trail, as you run onto a screen.

Gilligan's Gold is both enjoyable and infuriating. You will either be fascinated by the challenge of collecting the gold, or annoyed by the constant repetition of the three screens and your inability to pick things up when you need them.

Produced for the 48K Spectrum by Ocean Software Ltd, Ralli Building, Stanley Street, Manchester M3 5FD.


Rating: 50%

Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair Programs Issue 27, January 1985   page(s) 17

(Strangely, Gilligan's Gold is also reviewed on page 13 of the same issue with a Rating of 50%. The text is identical.)

PRICE: £5.90
GAME TYPE: Arcade

There you were, innocently prospecting in the mine, collecting bags of gold and putting them in your barrow, when things began to be much more difficult. Green with envy, outlaws are trying to knock you out and steal your booty. It would be easy to avoid them except that the mine is maze-like in its intricacy, and there are pit trucks running out of control along many passages.

Gilligan's Gold has you racing against the clock to collect your gold and avoid the outlaws. There are some points in your favour. You can leap into the pit trucks at some points, and thus avoid the outlaws. You can also knock out the outlaws by dropping bags of gold on them as they climb ladders, or by taking a pickaxe and smashing them over the head with it.

There are a few minor irritations to the game. Picking something up is very difficult. You seize a pick, rush towards an outlaw with it, only to discover the pick is still lying on the ground and you are defenceless. Moving from screen to screen does seem to confuse the outlaws. One minute they are following you along a straight passage, the next they have vanished. Conversely, one can appear, hot on your trail, as you run onto a screen.

Produced for the 48K Spectrum by Ocean Software Ltd, Ralli Building, Stanley Street, Manchester M3 5FD.


Rating: 55%

Transcript by Chris Bourne

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