Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade


by Tiertex Ltd (Mark Haigh-Hutchinson, Mark Tait), Blue Turtle: Leigh Christian
US Gold Ltd
1989
Sinclair User Issue 133, March 1993   page(s) 19

Indie is, as ever, on the hunt for ancient treasure, but things never go as smoothly as expected and the bad guys never give in without a fight. There are four game levels, these vary from darkened caves to a zeppelin. On the final level Indie must search for the greatest of prizes... for the Holy Grail.

The graphics are excellent and the main sprites are very lifelike, hat, whip, everything bar the stubble. And there's enough action to keep any Indie fan sweating.

Label: Kixx
Memory: 48K/128K
Price: £3.99 Tape
Reviewer: Mark Patterson


Overall: 85%

Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair User Issue 90, September 1989   page(s) 26, 27

"Indy's back," the ad campaign shouted from the rooftops, "And this time he's bringing his dad!" Strange, as far as I can tell there isn't a hint of Conneryness to be found anywhere, which is by no means a bad thing. After all, no-one wants to see the movie just to see Indy's dad.

As you probably spotted from our demo last issue, Indy is quite a guy. He can walk left and right. He can jump. He can climb up and down ropes. He can crack his whip. He's even been known to throw a punch or two when necessary. He's quite a versatile guy. And so he needs to be because he's got quite a bit to get through. No less than four exciting scenarios from the exciting movie. You play the part of the lad himself, firstly in the form of the young Indy, partaking of the Cross of Coronado, which drops you deep down in a maze-like warren of caves, hunting a mysterious ankh. Guards not completely dissimilar to the thuggee are dotted about in prime positions just waiting to get a shot at you. Find the ankh and get out, and next you'll find yourself slap bang in the middle of an ancient temple in a way not a million miles removed from Heroes Of The Lance. Then to a slightly more up to date maze, racing around a Nazi Zeppelin, punching out guards and climbing ladders all over the shop. Finally comes the big one. The race through a Raiders Of The Lost Ark-like tunnel, leaping over and around traps in the search for the Holy Grail.

Probably the game's strongest point is its visual side. Quite a few nice digitised piccies adorn the game. As for the main sprite - it looks like Indy. It walks like Indy. It darn well IS Indy. Even when you leave the joystick it looks out at you in an Indy sort of way (yeah, ok Tone!?! - Al).

The backdrops are really nice too. The rocks and urns look very realistic, as does the interior of the Zeppelin. On most of the levels, the scrolling is normal, nothing outstanding, just regular. But on the Zeppelin level it's great. The Zeppelin bops up and doom constantly, as well as having four way scrolling when you move, so as you can probably imagine, that's quite an impressive image.

I've raved about the plot, and I've raved about the graphics. But what of the game? Well, if you're after a fast paced action arcade game, you'd better steer well clear. However, if you're after something that's a little more paced, but requires a groat deal more brainpower, then step this way sir, I think we might just have one to fit you.

Rather than being one set route, the paths to be taken on each level are many, and as you are given absolutely no indication as to where you are supposed to be going, it's down to trial and error as to whether you get there. However, beware! There are certain places you can get to and can't get out of, so be wary about dropping down holes or climbing high blocks.

It's good fun, and though not furiously addictive, or an essential purchase, it is a worthy one. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade captures the feel of the whole Indy character, and I look forward to seeing the adventure game.

Label: US Gold
Author: Tiertex
Price: £8.99
Memory: 48K/128K
Joystick: various
Reviewer: Tony Dillon


Graphics: 86%
Sound: 79%
Playability: 82%
Lastability: 76%
Overall: 80%

Summary: Enjoyable arcade romp. Whip crack away indeed!

Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair User Issue 120, February 1992   page(s) 40

Da da da dah, da da dah, it's Indy again. Sean Connery made a big appearance in the movie but doesn't show his mug at all in this blockbuster game.

For that matter neither does the lovely, lovely, leggy blonde German spy but these faults aside, we have here a fine game with lots of variety, an incredibly accurate Indy main sprite and good, controllable action.

The four game levels take place in mazes that vary from caves to temples and to a Zeppelin. All the graphics look realistic and recreate the movie atmosphere quite accurately. As usual, Indy is on the hunt for lost, ancient artifacts which, as usual, are guarded by tricky booby-traps and raving-mad natives. You also have the added problem of other mindless explorers running around waving guns and trying to shoot you.

On level one. Indy begins in search of The Cross Of Coronado by collecting his famous whip with which He only has a limited amount of uses as shown on the screen before it runs out, and also he must collect burning torches to keep the caves light. After using ropes to jump Tarzan-style across obstacles, including a difficult waterfall, he should be able to locate the Cross and make his escape over the top of the train. Other levels include the creepy catacombs, a huge airship and the final search for the Holy Grail... Indy and the Last Crusade is a good action game. The playability is good and graphics are brilliantly detailed. Unfortunately the sound is very basic and doesn't do the game any justice, but apart from that it's still well worthwhile buy.

Label: Kixx
Memory: 48K/128K
Price: £3.99 Tape
Reviewer: Tony Naqvi


GARTH: Running along the tops of trains, fighting my way out of giant Zeppelins, killing rats, yes it all in a days work for me but even superheroes can tire of it all after a while.

Overall: 81%

Summary: Whip crackin' Indy type action that takes you up, down and across with nicely detailed large graphics.

Transcript by Chris Bourne

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